Category: plumbing

Eliminate Drain Stink-Bugs and Trap Primers

Rick Ensley will be conducting a QuickFire Session at the NFMT 2017 March 9 in Baltimore

Join leading equipment and service providers like Rick Ensley for a quick presentation on the expo hall floor. Get up to speed with the latest Plumbing technology and trends like SureSeal a proven trap seal device that blocks drain stink and bugs from entering the building through floor drains without using water.

Visit us at Booth #1704

28 Feb

How do I drain this water?

user Mr_Assault_08 asked:

Getting a new home and I noticed the water build up in the drain pan. It wasn’t here when they installed it, maybe after they tested the heater or something. But I’m worried the water here will eventually (years) damage the tank. So how do I drain it??

Answer: You could just sponge it out. At the big box hardware stores, they have sponges in the tile section that would work great.
– jjmcquade

Another alternative answer: Check your pressure relief valve. It’s probably blowing off. If it is, you’ll want to get a water pressure gauge and check your water pressure. If it’s above 85 psi you’ll want a water pressure regulator at your main and an expansion tank on the cold feed to the water heater. If you get this far make sure to brace the expansion tank so it doesn’t snap your water line and pump it up to match the pressure of your house. Hopefully it’s just a bad relief valve. Good luck bud
– Lostmyoldaccount88

source

09 Feb

Plumbing: Fixing a stuck shut off valve

y8wye3oi9bqaqkjsbtjfthfaaugtzjtzx69akd6rthqJuch asks: I’m trying to turn my hose spigots off, but I’m having issues. The main issue is that one of the valves is stuck (see image). When I went to turn it off it was missing a handle, so I went out and bought a replacement. When I turn the handle, it just spins against the shaft but doesn’t turn it, so the valve doesn’t shut. My second spigot won’t close all the way (not pictured, but I can get an image if it matters to anyone). The handle is turned as far as I can make it go, but water still drips out of the spigot when I leave it open. I appreciate any advice on how to fix either of these issues.

EZ-C heroically answers:

Those gate valves should be replaced with 1/4 turn ball valves anyway. I’d cut it out and put in new valves.

What is pictured is soldered copper which you probably don’t want to work with. Instead you can use sharkbite fittings to work with the copper pipe. Very simple to use.

Shut off the water at the meter. Get a cheap pipe cutter. Cut pipe, use sharkbite fitting / valve. Turn water back on. Done.

17 Nov

Plumbing: Looking for advice with water service fix?

0llq4jcternarybit writes:

The valve farthest right is leaking. Below that is heavily corroded galv that goes into the ground. Moving right, the first tee feeds into a sprinkler system which is the PVC you see in the lower-right of the corner. I want to leave that stuff intact because it’s working fine and it would be a huge hassle to mess with.

Moving right again, I guess that’s a pressure regulator? No idea what the ball valve is doing there, I guess just another shutoff option. Then it goes into PVC and back into galv into the house.

I partially exposed the corroded buried galv going into the first valve, and it’s horrible. Super corroded, must be original from 1956. Got about 2′ exposed before I ran out of time. The valve and exposed pipe is leaking pretty good, 2-3 drips per second now.

I want to replace the corroded galv and leaking valve, but I also want to do everything else as correct as possible.

Questions:

  1. What do I replace the galv with? I guess UPC states I can put almost anything underground. Thinking either poly or PVC, then backfilled with sand. Open to input.
  2. Do I need a pressure regulator at all?
  3. Any other recommendations for cleaning this up and doing it as properly as possible?

Thanks.

Answer: Check code to see what see if they allow PVC or Pex  for underground water supply. I personally like copper, use rolled soft copper or PEX for the water service from the water meter to the house, with those products you will have no connections underground. The ball valve was probably installed because the gate valve for the water service was bad.

The pressure regulator is there for a reason so make sure you reinstall it.

As far as cleaning up that mess, I would run the new water service straight up to the house service. Between the ground and the service install a ball valve, after that install the regulator, tee off for the sprinkler and tie into the house service. You should be able to install the regulator vertically. Get the model number and call the manufacturer to make sure. Also if you use copper you will need a di-electric union to isolate the copper from the Galvanized pipe to prevent electrolysis. Pex will be the easiest to install if it is allowed in your area

– Rick Ensley, SureSeal Product Manager

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22 Sep