RectorSeal® Introduces Safe, Quick and Easy Leak Sealant Injection Method– AC Leak Freeze® PRO

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AC Leak Freeze® Pro is the leak sealant formula and applicator combination that’s safe for the HVAC/R service tech and the refrigeration system.

Houston–RectorSeal® LLC, a manufacturer of quality HVAC/R products, has introduced AC Leak Freeze® Pro, a safe, quick and easy refrigerant leak sealant applicator for residential and commercial refrigeration and air conditioning systems.

AC Leak Freeze Pro is an 11.5-inch-long applicator that consists of a flexible, easy-to-handle, transparent refrigeration hose and an attached copper reservoir, which contain a total 1.46-ounces of the same trusted, non-polymer, ac leak sealant formula as the renowned syringe-based AC Leak Freeze injector. Unlike some other disposable leak sealant applicators, AC Leak Freeze Pro doesn’t require a system pump down with R-410A systems and safely withstands all typical refrigerant pressures.

The Pro applicator is designed for use with 1.5 to 6-ton systems  and is available with both the blue AC Leak Freeze and green AC Leak Freeze with Magic Frost formulas, the latter which contains a compressor life-extending lubricant additive.

One side of the hose connects to the refrigeration system’s low side. The AC Leak Freeze formula is propelled into the system within seconds once the hose’s reservoir is connected to either the high side or a refrigerant cylinder via a charging manifold. The disposable, one-time-use, AC Leak Freeze Pro applicator’s nylon hose, brass fittings and copper reservoir are all 100-percent recyclable.

AC Leak Freeze Pro is the HVAC/R industry’s safest formula for service technician and the refrigeration system. It’s proven compatibility flows with refrigerant/oil to permanently seal small leaks and prevent them in the future. The patent-pending refrigerant leak sealant formula is not moisture activated, has a safer flashpoint rating than the competition, and doesn’t use polymers that can potentially clog compressors, recovery/evacuation units, Schrader valves, capillary tubes, TXV valves, micro channels or manifold gauges.

Other AC Leak Freeze Pro features are:

  • hose and reservoir are factory-sealed to prevent injecting air or atmospheric moisture into the system;
  • the nylon hose’s 45-degree connection fitting allows easier hand access than straight fittings in cramped Schrader valve environments;
  • transparent hose eliminates guess work as to when application is completed;
  • and boxed four-color packaging designed for distributor J-hook merchandisers.

29 Nov

Plumbing: Fixing a stuck shut off valve

y8wye3oi9bqaqkjsbtjfthfaaugtzjtzx69akd6rthqJuch asks: I’m trying to turn my hose spigots off, but I’m having issues. The main issue is that one of the valves is stuck (see image). When I went to turn it off it was missing a handle, so I went out and bought a replacement. When I turn the handle, it just spins against the shaft but doesn’t turn it, so the valve doesn’t shut. My second spigot won’t close all the way (not pictured, but I can get an image if it matters to anyone). The handle is turned as far as I can make it go, but water still drips out of the spigot when I leave it open. I appreciate any advice on how to fix either of these issues.

EZ-C heroically answers:

Those gate valves should be replaced with 1/4 turn ball valves anyway. I’d cut it out and put in new valves.

What is pictured is soldered copper which you probably don’t want to work with. Instead you can use sharkbite fittings to work with the copper pipe. Very simple to use.

Shut off the water at the meter. Get a cheap pipe cutter. Cut pipe, use sharkbite fitting / valve. Turn water back on. Done.

17 Nov

What is this light in my bathroom vent? Humidity sensor?

xfkolqyraredditusername2 asks: What is this light in my bathroom vent? Humidity sensor?

Answer (from Iforgatmyusername): It’s the humidity sensor. No it’s not a camera.

Humidity Sensor Operations for Hampton Bay 80 CFM No Cut Ceiling Humidity Sensing Bath Fan

1 Humidity sensing mode. Move the wall on/off switch to the “ON” position. The LED indicator light in the fan is BLUE. The fan will automatically go on when the humidity level in the room goes above 60%.

2 Full speed mode. Cycle the wall on/off switch to the “OFF” position, then back to the “ON” position. The LED indicator light in the fan is AMBER.

3 Fan off. Move the wall on/off switch to the “OFF” position

15 Nov

2017 AHR Expo Las Vegas

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Come by our booth, #N9935, at the 2017 AHR Expo in Las Vegas.

AHR EXPO: THE WORLD’S LARGEST HVACR MARKETPLACE

The International Air-Conditioning, Heating, Refrigerating Exposition (AHR Expo), which started 85 years ago as a heating and ventilation show, has grown into the HVACR event of the year and is held in major cities across the U.S. The 2017 Show will be in Las Vegas, hosting more than 2,000 exhibitors and attracting crowds of 60,000 industry professionals from every state in America and 150 countries worldwide. It provides a unique forum designed expressly for the HVACR community, allowing professionals to get together to share new products, technologies, and ideas. The AHR Expo is co-sponsored by ASHRAE and AHRI, and is held concurrently with ASHRAE’s Winter Conference.

WHEN & WHERE

2017 AHR Expo
Las Vegas Convention Center (map)
3150 Paradise Rd, Las Vegas, NV 89109

Monday, January 30 | 10am-6pm
Tuesday, January 31 | 10am-6pm
Wednesday, February 1 | 10am-4pm

10 Nov

INSTALLING FIRESTOP SYSTEMS OR FIRE CAULK?

1000fcia.org’s latest issue has an excellent artcile about whether or not to choose firestop systems or fire caulk:

MANY HAVE HEARD ABOUT ‘FIRESTOP.’ WAIT, WHAT? WHAT’S FIRESTOP? Firestop is a tested and listed SYSTEM. The SYSTEM comes from the many fire tests conducted at leading laboratories like FM Approvals, Intertek or Underwriters Laboratories. The manufacturers of these materials invest a lot of money and time ensuring that they—the materials— in fact, work for the specific application and required time, based on proven fire test procedures, such as ASTM E 814 and UL 1479 for penetrations and ASTM E 2307, ASTM E 2837, ASTM E 1966 and UL 2079 for joints. Therefore, firestopping should be all about listed, classified firestop SYSTEMS. The SYSTEMS are an assemblage of materials—the floor or wall assembly, annular space or joint size, type, size of penetrating item and possible coverings that have been tested for a particular application, a particular hourly fire-resistancerating and/or smoke-resistant property. The SYSTEMS are then listed and classified by FM Approvals, Intertek or UL, and/or other credible independent third-party testing labs. Now we come to the installation of these firestop systems, and it seems that despite the hundreds of millions of dollars invested by the manufacturers in testing, that some in the industry continue to refer to it as, “we installed the fire caulk, so the floor and wall are now rated.” Really? There’s a magic product that provides fire-ratings?

For the full article, head on over to this page, and consider subscribing

20 Oct